Burg Eltz

germany

We stayed in Cochem during our time in Germany, so in order to see Burg Eltz we had to take a train to to Moselkern.

Moselkern is lovely – it’s a very quiet town with beautiful old houses. It took about 20 minutes to reach the start of the walking track to Burg Eltz from the train station.

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The castle is surrounded on three sides by the Elzbach River – a tributary on the north side of the Moselle. It is balanced high up on a 70-meter rock spur and was located on an important Roman trade route between rich farmlands and their markets.

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The Eltz Forest has been declared a nature reserve by Flora-Fauna-Habitat and Natura 2000. The walk through the forest took us about 30 minutes and when we finally saw the castle peeking through the trees it looked like something out of a fairy tale…

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Burg Eltz is a medieval castle nestled in the hills above the Moselle River between Koblenz and Trier in Germany. It is still owned by a branch of the same family (the Eltz family) that lived there in the 12th century, 33 generations ago.

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The Rübenach and Rodendorf families’ homes in the castle are open to the public, while the Kempenich branch of the family uses the other third of the castle. The public is admitted seasonally from April to October. Visitors can view the treasury which has gold, silver and porcelain artefacts.

Information from Wikipedia.

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Beilstein

germany

The boat journey from Cochem to Beilstein along the Moselle was beautiful.

 

The small village of Beilstein is one of the best preserved historical places on the Moselle and is also sometimes known as a miniature Dornröschen der Mosel (“Sleeping Beauty of the Moselle”).

 

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The ruins of Castle Metternich tower above the village, which despite its small size, once belonged to the like-named noble family.

Kasteel de Haar

The Netherlands

De Haar Castle or Kasteel de Haar is located near Utrecht in The Netherlands.

The medieval House De Haar dates from the 13th century. It fell into disrepair in the 18th and 19th centuries. Architect Pierre Cuypers (famous for his designs of the Rijksmuseum and the Central Station in Amsterdam) restored and rebuilt De Haar for baron Etienne van Zuylen van Nijevelt van de Haar. The rebuilding took from 1892 till 1912 and was a project unique of its kind in all of Europe.

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Surrounding the castle there is a huge park with various gardens designed by Hendrik Copijn.

The park contains many waterworks and a formal garden which is reminiscent of the French gardens of Versailles. During the Second World War many of the gardens were lost because the wood was used to light fires and the soil was used to grow vegetables.

However the gardens are now restored in their original state.

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In order to decorate the park the entire village of Haarzuilens, except for the town church, was demolished. The inhabitants were moved a kilometer away and lived as the Castle’s tenants. The new village was also built in a pseudo-medieval style and features a rural village green.

Information from Wikipedia and Kastel De Haar

Ruins of Brederode

The Netherlands

Brederode Castle, also called the Ruins of Brederode, is located near Santpoort-Zuid in the Netherlands. The castle was founded in the second half of the 13th century by William I van Brederode (1215–1285).

 

 

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The name Brederode is a reference to a wooded area called Brede Roede (literally: broad wood), that was cleared and on which the castle was built. To begin with the castle was simply made up of  a tower but around 1300 Dirk II van Brederode had the tower pulled down and replaced with a proper castle.

Information from Wikipedia.

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Paleis Het Loo

The Netherlands

Het Loo Palace or Paleis Het Loo (meaning “The Woods Palace”) is a palace in Apeldoorn in the Netherlands and was built by the House of Orange-Nassau.

 

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The symmetrical Dutch Baroque building was designed by Jacob Roman and Johan van Swieten and was built between 1684 and 1686 for stadtholder-king William III and Mary II of England. The garden was designed by Claude Desgotz.

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The palace then remained a private residence of the younger House of Orange-Nassau until the death of Queen Wilhelmina in 1962. In 1960 Queen Wilhelmina had declared that when she died the palace would go to the State. She did, however, request that it would be returned to her family if the Dutch were to abolish the monarchy.

The palace became property of the Dutch state in 1962 when Wilhelmina died at Het Loo Palace. Her daughter, Queen Juliana, never lived there, but her younger daughter, Princess Margriet, lived in the right wing until 1975.

The building was renovated between 1976 and 1982. Since 1984, the palace is a state museum open for the general public, showing interiors with original furniture, objects and paintings of the House of Orange-Nassau. It also houses a library devoted to the House of Orange-Nassau and the Museum van de Kanselarij der Nederlandse Orden (Museum of the Netherlands Orders of Knighthood’s Chancellery) with books and other material concerning decorations and medals.

Information from Wikipedia.